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Ophiomastix annulosa   (Lamarck, 1816)

chain-link brittle star

Native range | All suitable habitat | Point map | Year 2100
This map was computer-generated and has not yet been reviewed.
Ophiomastix annulosa   AquaMaps   Data sources: GBIF OBIS
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Image of Ophiomastix annulosa (chain-link brittle star)
Picture by Batoy, Corazon B.

Classification / Names Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Ophiuroidea | Ophiurida | Ophiocomidae

Environment / Climate / Range

Reef-associated; depth range 4 - 11 m (Ref. 81187).  Tropical

Distribution Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Indo-West Pacific: from Maldives to China.

Length at first maturity / Size / Weight / Age

Maturity: Lm ?  range ? - ? cm Max length : 2.4 cm WD male/unsexed; (Ref. 87041)

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Depth information reported for China (Ref. 81187). Size refers to disk diameter (Ref. 87041). Found beneath coral slabs and in holes and crevices. Possesses enlarged, modified, venomous spines (Ref. 800). Subtidal. Association with Ophiomastix scolopendrina may serve as its strategy in obtaining food from the host's arms (Ref. 102356). Members of the class Ophiuroidea are mostly gonochoric, others are protandric. Fertilization is external. Brooding is common, bursae is used as brood chambers where the embryos develop into juveniles and later crawl out from the bursal slits. Life cycle: Embryos hatch into free-swimming planktotrophic larvae and later metamorphose into tiny brittle stars which sink down the bottom where they grow into adult form (Ref. 833).

Life cycle and mating behavior Maturity | Reproduction | Spawning | Eggs | Fecundity | Larvae

Members of the class Ophiuroidea are mostly gonochoric, others are protandric. Fertilization is external. Brooding is common, bursae is used as brood chambers where the embryos develop into juveniles and later crawl out from the bursal slits. Life cycle: Embryos hatch into free-swimming planktotrophic larvae and later metamorphose into tiny brittle stars which sink down the bottom where they grow into adult form.

Main reference References | Coordinator | Collaborators

Schoppe, S. 2000. (Ref. 800)

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 114614)

   

CITES status (Ref. 94142)

Not Evaluated

Threat to humans

  Harmless

Human uses


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More information

Countries
FAO areas
Ecosystems
Occurrences
Introductions
Stocks
Ecology
Diet
Food items
Common names
Synonyms
Predators
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources

BHL | BOLD Systems | Check for other websites | Check FishWatcher | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(Publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GloBI | GOBASE | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | National databases | PubMed | Scirus | FishBase | Tree of Life | uBio | uBio RSS | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimates of some properties based on models

Preferred temperature (Ref. 115969): 24.9 - 29.3, mean 28.4 (based on 2609 cells; Ref. 115970).
Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
Low vulnerability (10 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown