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Neorossia caroli   (Joubin, 1902)

Carol bobtail

Native range | All suitable habitat | Point map | Year 2100
This map was computer-generated and has not yet been reviewed.
Neorossia caroli   AquaMaps   Data sources: GBIF OBIS
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Image of Neorossia caroli (Carol bobtail)
Picture by FAO

Classification Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Cephalopoda | Sepiolida | Sepiolidae | Rossiinae

Main reference References | Biblio | Coordinator | Collaborators

Jereb, P. and C.F.E. Roper (eds.). 2005. (Ref. 1695)

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 5.1 cm ML male/unsexed; (Ref. 1695); 8.3 cm ML (female)

Environment

Bathydemersal; depth range 40 - 1744 m (Ref. 1695)

Climate / Range

Tropical; 66°N - 55°S, 60°W - 36°E (Ref. 107071)

Distribution Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean: from southwest Iceland to Southern Africa and Falkland Islands.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Most bathyal among the members of the family. Demersal. Prefers deep muddy bottoms characterized by Isidella elongata populations, often overlapping with Rossia macrosoma in the upper level of its distributional range and frequently associated with Sepietta oweniana and Rondeletiola minor. In the western Mediterranean, it is the most common cephalopod captured between 1000 and 2000 m, along with Bathypolypus sponsalis but is most abundant between 400 and 600 to 700 m in both eastern and western parts of this sea. Mature individuals found throughout the year suggest an extended spawning season. Its large eggs (8-10 mm diameter and covered by a hard violet-coloured coating), are attached to hard substrates at various depths. Lifespan approximated between 12 and 24 months. Usually taken as trawl fishery bycatch; of minor commercial importance. Sold fresh and frozen in fish markets with other bobtail squids (Ref. 1695). Members of the class Cephalopoda are gonochoric. Male and female adults usually die shortly after spawning and brooding, respectively. Mating behavior: Males perform various displays to attract potential females for copulation. During copulation, male grasp the female and inserts the hectocotylus into the female's mantle cavity where fertilization usually occurs. Life cycle: Embryos hatch into planktonic stage and live for some time before they grow larger and take up a benthic existence as adults (Ref. 833).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 114614)

CITES status (Ref. 94142)

Not Evaluated

Threat to humans

Human uses

Fisheries: minor commercial
| FisheriesWiki |

More information

Countries
FAO areas
Ecosystems
Occurrences
Introductions
Stocks
Ecology
Diet
Food items
Common names
Synonyms
Predators
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources

BHL | BOLD Systems | Check for other websites | Check FishWatcher | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(Publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GOBASE | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | National databases | PubMed | Scirus | FishBase | Tree of Life | uBio | uBio RSS | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimation of some characteristics with mathematical models

Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
Low vulnerability (10 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown